Finding Our Cause in Nicaragua

finding our cause in nicaragua

Today was about to be one of my favorite days I’d ever had in Nicaragua. I woke up so excited for the day—coffee was unnecessary. Caira, Jonathon, and our new friend from the UK, James, walked from Hospedaje Elizabeth around the corner to La Movil Biblioteca (The Mobile Library). Volunteering here was something I had been looking forward to doing since we moved here. I had done some research online about the various non-profits in the area and this one in particular stood out to me.

The Mobile Library in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua

In Nicaragua, there are no public libraries—something I know I certainly took for granted while growing up in the States. Unfortunately, therefore, kids in school have a hard time acquiring books to read both at school and at home for fun. This problem is what created the Mobile Library Project. Started by an American expat from Colorado, the library is stationed in San Juan del Sur and three days a week, every week, the library goes out to schools all over southern Nicaragua and acts as a public library where they can borrow used books.

The Mobile Library in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua

As I wrote in my About Me, helping children around the world is one of my greatest passions. So, before we left for Nicaragua, we integrated giving back into our business model so that the giving is self sustaining rather than dependent on donations. We also wanted to give kids something tangible that would make a significant difference in their lives rather than just give money away and hope that it makes a difference. For every product that we sell overseas, we will give back a product here to a specific cause in Nicaragua. Sell a product, give a product. One for One.

The Mobile Library in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua

Both Jon and I are very connected to education and believe that it’s the place to start in helping developing countries. It’s the root of where change can happen. Where kids can learn and eventually build businesses for their country, help their families or even go on to teach the next generation. We’ve spoken to several micro-loan companies in Nicaragua, NGOs (Non-Governmental Organizations) as well as the local people themselves here and the consensus is that what really the people here really need are the tools to be able to do things themselves. Simply giving them things actually enables and promotes dependency. It makes sense and goes back to the old saying: “Give a man a fish, feed him for an hour. Teach a man to fish, feed him for a lifetime.” What people need is to be taught how to run their own economy, develop it and independently progress forward. How will they learn how to do all of this? Education.

The Mobile Library in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua

We’ve incorporated this aspect in our business plan and have integrated it into our finances. The only things we needed to do next were to find the partnered NGO(s)  and the specific product our business would give back to the schools here. We needed to figure out what they really needed. What would significantly help them in their studies and in the classroom? Volunteering at the schools with the Mobile Library was the first big step in answering these important questions.

The Mobile Library in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua

We jumped into the back of the pickup truck that had two wooden benches installed on either side for volunteers to sit on comfortably. I was so excited—like a kid in a candy store. I couldn’t wait to see the school, meet the kids and to experience what I came to Nicaragua to do. Next Article: Nicaraguan Elementary School

Finding Our Cause in Nicaragua

0 thoughts on “Finding Our Cause in Nicaragua

  1. blinkpack says:

    Josh from the BlinkPack blog here. Just wanted to say ‘thanks’ for visiting my post. I am new to blogging, and am really encouraged when people like you stop by. Looks like you are doing great things; thanks for the inspiration. Best! -Josh

  2. libertyofthinking says:

    Hi,
    Just wanted to say thank you for liking my post on my very new blog, when I got so touched by you and your work. Been doing myself charity work for a very long period of time, until I dropped out of the religious net through which we’ve been doing it, understanding too late, what was all about…
    I am so moved nevertheless seeing there’s still good, both as doers
    and to be done. Your lives, more than anything you do, will be the source of change for better in the needy recipients of your outpouring…
    Will be following you…
    With my deep respect, and friendly love…

    • lifeoutofthebox says:

      Thank you so much for your amazing comment. It was very touching to see that you wrote that to us. We will continue to do our best to help others and we cannot thank you enough for your support. Please let us know your thoughts on our comments because your comment truly made us feel great. Thank you very very much!

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  5. meL says:

    Love this line that you wrote: “Give a man a fish, feed him for an hour. Teach a man to fish, feed him for a lifetime.” I couldn’t agree for more. I would love to spread those words in my country, since so many people just like to give ‘fish’ just because they don’t have to be bother by ‘teach them to fish’. Education and books is something that couldn’t be separated. Cause I believe that reading is the key to open the journey to the whole world. So, keep on what you guys are doing, and I’ll follow behind…

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